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Types of Archery

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Types or Archery

 

Target Archery

“Target Archery” is when a series of arrows are shot at a target (attached to a backstop called a “butt) on a flat field. How many arrows and at what distances they are shot from are determined by what type of “shoot” that the archer is competing in. We will address the main target competition types below. Each “turn” is called shooting an “end”. Normally 3 or 6 arrows are shot, depending on the type of shoot and distances, then the scores are tallied.

Team NS at Target Nationals, Caledon, Ont.  2004

Claude Langois (CFB Halifax), Sean Wyatt (Osprey), Rhiannon Wyatt (Osprey), and Don Lohnes (Osprey)

 

 

Rhiannon Wyatt (left) shooting the Field Coarse at Target Nationals, Caledon, Ont. 2004

Field Archery

“Field Archery” differs from Target as the shooting takes place in the “field” or, in the case of some clubs, in the bushes and forests surrounding the club property. When shooting competitive field archery you walk in groups of 4 around a marked course in wooden or open landscape. The arrows are still shot into the “butts” (as noted above), however the size and type of the targets differ from target archery and the scoring is different as well. Additionally, depending on your age and equipment category, each butt is shot at differing distances and also uphill, downhill or over streams, making the field course a little more challenging than target shooting. Challenging or not, Field Archery is great for archers that are looking to get some exercise and have some variety in their shooting. A basic accuracy should be obtained by shooting target archery first as field archery tend to be less forgiving for recovering missed arrows.
3-D Archery

3-D archery is one of North America’s fasted growing sports. 3-D archery consists of shooting either burlap sacs (called a “bag course”) or at 3 dimensional foam animals at unknown distances. The scoring is dependant on where your arrow strikes these foam animals or bags. Originally developed for hunting practice it's now shot by many non hunters due to its competitive nature. With Pro 3D archers in the US earning $150,000+ per year it's not hard to see why. Approximately 40%-50% of the Victoria Bowmen club members shoot either 3-D or field archery.
 

John Dorey (left) at 3D Nationals, Prince George, BC 2004

 

 

Types of Equipment

Age Categories

Types of Competitions